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Kitchen & Cooking Safety

The basics from our own United States Fire Administration are presented here,

with many links to other fine kitchen and cooking safety web sites.

 

Click on any of these topics to see more info ...
 -- Cooking Fire Safety
 -- Safe Cooking Behaviors(& Grilling Out)
 -- If Your Clothes Catch Fire
 -- Use Equipment for Intended Purposes Only
 -- Protect Children from Scalds and Burns
 -- Prevent Scalds and Burns
 -- Install and Use Microwave Ovens Safely
 -- How and When to Fight Cooking Fires
 -- Nuisance Smoke Alarms

 

[ Take me to the links for more information. ]

 

Cooking Fire Safety

Many families gather in the kitchen to spend time together, but it can be one of the most hazardous rooms in the house if you don't practice safe cooking behaviors. Cooking equipment, most often a range or stovetop, is the leading cause of reported home fires and home fire injuries in the United States. Cooking equipment is also the leading cause of unreported fires and associated injuries.

It's a recipe for serious injury or even death to wear loose clothing (especially hanging sleeves), walk away from a cooking pot on the stove, or leave flammable materials, such as potholders or paper towels, around the stove. Whether you are cooking the family holiday dinner or a snack for the children, practicing safe cooking behaviors will help keep you and your family safe.

Safe Cooking Behaviors

Choose the Right Equipment and Use It Properly

bullet Always use cooking equipment tested and approved by a recognized testing facility.
bullet Follow manufacturers' instructions and code requirements when installing and operating cooking equipment.
bullet Plug microwave ovens and other cooking appliances directly into an outlet. Never use an extension cord for a cooking appliance, as it can overload the circuit and cause a fire.

Use Barbecue Grills Safely

bullet Position the grill well away from siding, deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
bullet Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas, and foot traffic.
bullet Keep children and pets away from the grill area by declaring a 3-foot "kid-free zone" around the grill.
bullet Put out several long-handled grilling tools to give the chef plenty of clearance from heat and flames when cooking food.
bullet Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below grill so it cannot be ignited by a hot grill.
bullet Use only outdoors! If used indoors, or in any enclosed spaces, such as tents, barbecue grills pose both a fire hazard and the risk of exposing occupants to carbon monoxide.
bullet *See a new report on grilling fires from the United States Fire Administration: (See the Full Report)

"The report is part of the Topical Fire Report Series and is based on 2006 to 2008 data from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS). According to the report, an estimated 5,700 grill fires on residential properties occur annually in the United States, resulting in an estimated average of 10 deaths, 100 injuries, and $37 million in property loss. Over half (57 percent) of grill fires on residential properties occur in the four months of May, June, July, and August and almost half (49 percent) of these fires occur during the hours of 5 to 8 p.m. In addition, 32 percent of grill fires on residential properties start on patios, terraces, screened-in porches, or courtyards, while an additional 24 percent start on exterior balconies and unenclosed porches. Finally, propane is the power source in 69 percent of all grill fires on residential properties."

Charcoal Grills

bullet Purchase the proper starter fluid and store out of reach of children and away from heat sources.
bullet Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals or kindling have already been ignited, and never use any flammable or combustible liquid other than charcoal starter fluid to get the fire going.
bullet Propane Grills
bullet Check the propane cylinder hose for leaks before using it for the first time each year. A light soap and water solution applied to the hose will reveal escaping propane quickly by releasing bubbles.
bullet If you determined your grill has a gas leak by smell or the soapy bubble test and there is no flame:
bulletTurn off the propane tank and grill.
bulletIf the leak stops, get the grill serviced by a professional before using it again.
bulletIf the leak does not stop, call the fire department.
bullet If you smell gas while cooking, immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not attempt to move the grill.
bullet All propane cylinders manufactured after April 2002 must have overfill protection devices (OPD). OPDs shut off the flow of propane before capacity is reached, limiting the potential for release of propane gas if the cylinder heats up. OPDs are easily identified by their triangular-shaped hand wheel.
bullet Use only equipment bearing the mark of an independent testing laboratory. Follow the manufacturers' instructions on how to set up the grill and maintain it.
bullet Never store propane cylinders in buildings or garages. If you store a gas grill inside during the winter, disconnect the cylinder and leave it outside.

Watch What You Heat

bullet The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking.
bullet Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
bullet If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you're cooking.
bullet Stay alert! To prevent cooking fires, you have to be alert. You won't be if you are sleepy, have been drinking alcohol, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy.

Keep Things That Can Catch Fire and Heat Sources Apart

bullet Keep anything that can catch fire - potholders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, towels, or curtains - away from your stovetop.
bullet Keep the stovetop, burners, and oven clean.
bullet Keep pets off cooking surfaces and nearby countertops to prevent them from knocking things onto the burner.
bullet Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. Loose clothing can dangle onto stove burners and catch fire if it comes into contact with a gas flame or electric burner.

If Your Clothes Catch Fire

If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll. Stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover face with hands. Roll over and over or back and forth to put out the fire. Immediately cool the burn with cool water for 3 to 5 minutes and then seek emergency medical care.

Use Equipment for Intended Purposes Only

Cook only with equipment designed and intended for cooking, and heat your home only with equipment designed and intended for heating. There is additional danger of fire, injury, or death if equipment is used for a purpose for which it was not intended.

Protect Children from Scalds and Burns

bullet Young children are at high risk of being burned by hot food and liquids. Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a "kid-free zone" of 3 feet (1 meter) around the stove.
bullet Keep young children at least 3 feet (1 meter) away from any place where hot food or drink is being prepared or carried. Keep hot foods and liquids away from table and counter edges.
bullet When young children are present, use the stove's back burners whenever possible.
bullet Never hold a child while cooking, drinking, or carrying hot foods or liquids.
bullet Teach children that hot things burn.
bullet When children are old enough, teach them to cook safely. Supervise them closely.

Prevent Scalds and Burns

bullet To prevent spills due to overturn of appliances containing hot food or liquids, use the back burner when possible and/or turn pot handles away from the stove's edge. All appliance cords need to be kept coiled and away from counter edges.
bullet Use oven mitts or potholders when moving hot food from ovens, microwave ovens, or stovetops. Never use wet oven mitts or potholders as they can cause scald burns.
bullet Replace old or worn oven mitts.
bullet Treat a burn right away, putting it in cool water. Cool the burn for 3 to 5 minutes. If the burn is bigger than your fist or if you have any questions about how to treat it, seek medical attention right away.

Install and Use Microwave Ovens Safely

bullet Place or install the microwave oven at a safe height, within easy reach of all users. The face of the person using the microwave oven should always be higher than the front of the microwave oven door. This is to prevent hot food or liquid from spilling onto a user's face or body from above and to prevent the microwave oven itself from falling onto a user.
bullet Never use aluminum foil or metal objects in a microwave oven. They can cause a fire and damage the oven.
bullet Heat food only in containers or dishes that are safe for microwave use.
bullet Open heated food containers slowly away from the face to avoid steam burns. Hot steam escaping from the container or food can cause burns.
bullet Foods heat unevenly in microwave ovens. Stir and test before eating.

How and When to Fight Cooking Fires

bullet When in doubt, just get out. When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number after you leave.
bullet If you do try to fight the fire, be sure others are already getting out and you have a clear path to the exit.
bullet Always keep an oven mitt and a lid nearby when you are cooking. If a small grease fire starts in a pan, smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan (make sure you are wearing the oven mitt). Turn off the burner. Do not move the pan. To keep the fire from restarting, leave the lid on until the pan is completely cool.
bullet In case of an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed to prevent flames from burning you or your clothing.
bullet If you have a fire in your microwave oven, turn it off immediately and keep the door closed. Never open the door until the fire is completely out. Unplug the appliance if you can safely reach the outlet.
bullet After a fire, both ovens and microwaves should be checked and/or serviced before being used again.
 

See the GUARDIAN III residential range-top fire suppression system:
                Automatic Fire Suppression
for Your Residential Cooking Equipment !

Nuisance Smoke Alarms

bullet Move smoke alarms farther away from kitchens according to manufacturers' instructions and/or install a smoke alarm with a pause button.
bullet If a smoke alarm sounds during normal cooking, press the pause button if the smoke alarm has one. Open the door or window or fan the area with a towel to get the air moving. Do not disable the smoke alarm or take out the batteries.
bullet Treat every smoke alarm activation as a likely fire and react quickly and safely to the alarm.

Related Topics

bullet Behavioral Mitigation of Cooking Fires
bullet Safety Tips for Turkey Fryers
bullet National Fire Protection Association - Cooking Safety (very good information)

 

Check-out more kitchen and cooking safety resources ...

Go here ... Safe Kids Worldwide - Kids and Cooking
Take a look ...

HOME COOKING FIRE PATTERNS AND TRENDS, John R. Hall, Jr.,

Fire Analysis and Research Division, National Fire Protection Association, July 2006

Go here ... Cooking Fire Safety; 1-pager from Penn State.
Take a look ...

FDNY Kitchen Cooking Safety Tips.  Kitchen Cooking Fire Safety  put the lid on kitchen fires

Go here ... City of Garden Grove, CA, Fire Department Cooking Fire Safety
Take a look ... From your friends at State Farm Insurance (watch the video, esp. the timer ...)
Go here ...  
Take a look ...  
Go here ...  
Take a look ...  

Kitchen and cooking safety from "Great Cooking" web site:

Photo by Bruce C. Moffitt, Owner & Chef

[ Click on the picture.]

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CONTACT INFORMATION:
DAVID CHAPLIN, CFPS, DABCHS-CHS IV
INTEGRATED FIRE and LIFE SAFETY SOLUTIONS, LLC
P O Box 828, Salem, VA 24153
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